Founder Of ‘Marshall Plan For Moms’ Talks About Empowering Working Women


Attorney, activist, and founder of Girls Who Code and the Marshall Plan for Moms, Reshma Saujani has spent over a decade building movements to fight for women and girls’ economic empowerment, working to close the gender gap in the tech sector, and most recently advocating for policies to support moms impacted by the pandemic.

“Women are a vital part of the family's economic lifeline. And that's really showing the pay gap,” says the author of the international bestseller, “Brave, Not Perfect.”

Saujani joins Dr. Phil to discuss her views on what it means to be successful, and what she says it will take to create lasting change to empower working women. New episodes of Phil in the Blanks drop Tuesdays.


Attorney, activist, and founder of Girls Who Code and the Marshall Plan for Moms, Reshma Saujani joins Dr. Phil to discuss what she says it will take to create lasting change to empower working women.


LISTEN NOW

Please help by sharing, rating, reviewing, and adding a comment on: Apple Podcasts or click here for other podcast platforms











Get Connected & Let Dr. Phil Know What You Thought About The Episode:


Instagram:

@DrPhil

@DrPhilPodcast


Twitter:

@DrPhilPodcast

@DrPhil


Facebook:

Podcast Page: DrPhilintheBlanks

Dr. Phil

Dr. Phil Phanatics Facebook Page (Members Only)


#PhilintheBlanks

#podcast


Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/reshmasaujani

Website: https://reshmasaujani.com

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/reshmasaujani/

FB: https://www.facebook.com/bravenotperfectbook/

 

More About Reshma Saujani Source: https://reshmasaujani.com

Reshma Saujani is a leading activist and the founder of Girls Who Code and the Marshall Plan for Moms. She has spent more than a decade building movements to fight for women and girls’ economic empowerment, working to close the gender gap in the tech sector, and most recently advocating for policies to support moms impacted by the pandemic. Reshma is also the author of the international bestseller Brave, Not Perfect, and her influential TED talk, “Teach girls, bravery not perfection,” has more than five million views globally.


Reshma began her career as an attorney and Democratic organizer. In 2010, she surged onto the political scene as the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress. During the race, Reshma visited local schools and saw the gender gap in computing classes firsthand, which led her to start Girls Who Code. She also served as New York City’s Deputy Public Advocate, where she created innovative partnerships to support DREAMers and promote campaign finance reform, among other initiatives.


In her nine-year tenure as the CEO of Girls Who Code, Reshma grew the organization to one of the largest and most prestigious non-profits in the country. Today, Girls Who Code has taught 300,000 girls through direct in-person computer science education programming, and reached 500 million people worldwide through its New York Times-bestselling book series and award-winning campaigns. In 2019, Girls Who Code was awarded Most Innovative Non-Profit by Fast Company.


In response to the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on America’s moms, Reshma launched the Marshall Plan for Moms to advocate for policies that value women’s labor in and out of the home. The movement has framed the national conversation about how we support moms and is backed by A-list celebrities, activists, and business leaders. Reshma has successfully worked with House and Senate leaders to introduce “Marshall Plan for Moms” legislation at the federal level and is continuing to act as an outside agitator to change culture through creative awareness campaigns.


Reshma is a graduate of the University of Illinois, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and Yale Law School. Her innovative approach to movement building has earned her broad recognition on lists including: Fortune World’s Greatest Leaders; Fortune 40 Under 40; WSJ Magazine Innovator of the Year; Forbes Most Powerful Women Changing the World; and Fast Company 100 Most Creative People, among others. She is the winner of the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education.


Reshma serves on the Board of Overseers for Harvard University and on the Board of Overseers for the International Rescue Committee, which provides aid to refugees and those impacted by humanitarian crises. In addition, she serves on the Board of Trustees of the Economic Club of New York, and as an ex-officio Trustee of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Reshma lives in New York City with her husband, Nihal, their sons, Shaan and Sai, and their bulldog, Stanley.


GIRLS WHO CODE Source: https://girlswhocode.com/

Our research shows we can close the gender gap in new entry-level tech jobs by 2030. And we're committed to evaluating our work, and industry data, to get us there.

  • WHAT WE DO: Girls Who Code is on a mission to close the gender gap in technology and to change the image of what a programmer looks like and does.

  • ABOUT GWC: THE GENDER GAP IN COMPUTING IS GETTING WORSE.

  • In 1995, 37% of computer scientists were women. Today, it’s only 24%.

  • Biggest drop off of girls in computer science is between the ages of 13 and 17.

  • GIRLS WHO CODE IS CHANGING THE GAME

  • We're reaching girls around the world and are on track to close the gender gap in new entry-level tech jobs by 2030.

  • OUR VALUES- These are the values that define our organization.

  • BRAVERY

  • SISTERHOOD

  • ACTIVISM

  • SUPPORT GIRLS WHO CODE!


RESEARCH/KEY FINDINGS

  • Served 500,000 girls, women and nonbinary individuals across the country & around the world since 2012.

  • 50% HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS: Half of our girls served come from historically underrepresented groups. This includes girls who are Black, Latinx, and from low-income households.

  • 7X National AVERAGE: Alumni are choosing to major in computer science, or related fields, at a rate 7 times the national average.

  • New research by Accenture and Girls Who Code shows that the share of women in computing jobs is in decline and suggests that universal access to computing in schools will not address the gender gap. Only by tailoring courses to girls’ specific needs can we boost their commitment to computing. This report recommends a fresh approach that could increase the number of women in computing to 3.9 million by 2025. That would lift their share from 24% to 39% of the computing workforce and generate $299 billion in additional cumulative earnings.



THE PROGRAMS


CLUBS PROGRAM- Clubs for students to explore coding in a fun & friendly environment.

  • Grades 3-12 grouped by grades 3-5 and 6-12

  • Beginner to Advanced

  • FREE

  • 1-2 hours per week after school or on weekends during the school year

COLLEGE & CAREER PROGRAMS-

Supporting college-aged students and early career professionals (18-25) in persisting in their computer science education and succeeding in their first internships and jobs.

  • College-aged students and early career professionals (18-25)

  • Career exploration

  • Career and interview readiness

  • Leadership development

  • Direct hiring pipeline

  • FREE

SUMMER PROGRAMS -Virtual summer program for high school students to learn coding and make an impact in their community while preparing for a career in tech.

Source link:https://girlswhocode.com/about-us


MARSHAL PLAN FOR MOMS Source: https://marshallplanformoms.com/

FINISHING THE FIGHT FOR WOMEN’S EQUALITY:National movement to center women in our economic recovery and champion public and private sector policies that support all moms.

THE PROBLEM

  • Our economy may be recovering from the pandemic, but women are being left behind. Moms are facing devastating declines in their careers and their mental health. We can’t go back to normal. For moms, “normal” wasn’t working in the first place.

  • 1.1M WOMEN ARE STILL OUT OF THE LABOR FORCE SINCE THE PANDEMIC

  • 58% OF WOMEN SAY THEIR MENTAL HEALTH HAS DECLINED IN THE LAST TWO YEARS

  • 75¢ ON THE DOLLAR THE AVERAGE MOM IS PAID, VERSUS WHITE FATHERS

  • OUR BOLD 360-PLAN: The Marshall Plan for Moms aims to create sweeping changes in three critical arenas. 1. WORKPLACE 2. CULTURE 3. GOVERNMENT

WORKPLACE: Organizing employees and C-level executives to transform our workplaces to finally work for moms.

  • THE BUSINESS CASE FOR CHILD CARE:

  • Moms can’t work without child care – period. Read our new report, with original data developed by our knowledge partner McKinsey, and learn more about the National Business Coalition for Child Care.

  • REPORT: COVID-19 and the Reduction of Women’s Labor Force Participation

  • 1.1M: THE NUMBER OF WOMEN STILL OUT OF THE LABOR FORCE AS OF JANUARY 2022. BY THE SAME POINT, MEN HAD RECOUPED ALL PANDEMIC-RELATED JOB LOSSES, EVEN GAINING AN ADDITIONAL 100,000 JOBS.4

  • 3.1 RATIO OF WOMEN WHO LOST THEIR JOBS RELATIVE TO MEN SINCE FEBRUARY 2020.

  • Making the Business Case for Child Care Benefits: PROVIDING CHILD CARE BENEFITS CAN IMPROVE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION RATES, WHICH MAY INCREASE WORKER PRODUCTIVITY AND REDUCE BURN-OUT.

  • 88% OF WOMEN WITH CHILDREN AGES 0-5 LOOKING FOR A JOB SAID THAT HAVING WORK FLEXIBILITY, PREDICTABLE HOURS, OR CHILD CARE SUPPORT WOULD MAKE THEM MORE LIKELY TO CHOOSE AN EMPLOYER.

  • Recruitment 69% of women with children ages 0-5 looking for employment stated that benefits that help with child care expenses or on-site child care would make them more likely to choose an employer.

  • Retention 83%: of women and 81% of men with children ages 0–5 said that child care benefits would be a very important or somewhat important factor in deciding whether to stay at their current employer or switch employers.

  • Advancement 53%:of women with children ages 0–5 cited child care as one of the reasons they left the workforce temporarily, took on fewer hours, or moved to a less demanding job.

  • How Businesses Can Support Parents and Mitigate the Great Resignation:

1. UNDERSTAND EMPLOYEE NEEDS.

  • Conduct assessments of employee child care needs to understand where gaps may exist for working parents in your organization.

2. RECOGNIZE THAT ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL.

  • Analyze survey results by race, gender, ethnicity, hourly vs. salaried workers, and single vs. multi-parent households to ensure solutions are adapted to different life experiences.

3. DESIGN IN CONSIDERATION OF BUSINESS FACTORS.

  • Create an approach that supports employees and works within your business model by analyzing various solutions and considering the return on investment of offering child care benefits.

4. BUILD AWARENESS.

  • Provide child care benefits—and empower employees to use them, which may also increase company loyalty and boost confidence in the workplace. SOURCE: https://marshallplanformoms.com/childcare-report/

  • PLAYBOOK FOR EMPLOYERS: Our new playbook for employers lays out the daily injustices working moms face and exactly what we need to return to, and thrive at, work.

1. GIVE US CONTROL OVER OUR SCHEDULES

2. SUPPORT US WITH CHILDCARE

3. OWN YOUR ROLE IN SHAPING DYNAMICS AT HOME

4. PRIORITIZE MOMS’ MENTAL HEALTH

5. CLOSE YOUR GENDER PAY GAP AND PAY MOMS FAIRLY

6. ROOT OUT THE MOTHERHOOD PENALTY

7. DON’T RUSH NEW MOMS BACK TO WORK BEFORE THEY’RE READY

8. PROVIDE BETTER ON-RAMPS TO BRING MOMS BACK TO WORK

9. GUARANTEE PAID SICK LEAVE

10. ADVOCATE FOR MOMS PUBLICLY CULTURE: Through creative campaigns and compelling thought leadership, changing the way motherhood is seen and valued in America.

  • A CURE FOR MOM GUILT

  • MOMS DESERVE MORE THAN FLOWERS

  • To raise awareness about how our broken policies impact moms, this Mother’s Day we launched the first-ever flower shop selling bouquets at prices that represent what moms are truly worth.

  • GOVERNMENT: Working in coalition with advocacy partners to campaign for paid leave, child care, and direct payments to mothers.

  • RALLY FOR PAID LEAVE: Together with Congresswoman Grace Meng, PL+US and other advocates in New York City, we fought to keep Paid Leave in the Build Back Better package.

  • BIPARTISAN POLL:Marshall Plan for Moms polled women across the political spectrum to find out how the pandemic has impacted mothers, and how lawmakers can help.

  • 50 MOMS, 50 STATES: With our partners at Income Movement and Magnolia Mothers Trust, we sent a letter signed by 50 moms from 50 states to the White House calling for the expanded Child Tax Credit to be made permanent.

  • MALE ALLIES CAMPAIGN: We organized male advocates, business leaders, and celebrities to join our movement in a full page Washington Post ad in support of Marshall Plan for Moms.

  • MARSHALL PLAN FOR MOMS LEGISLATION: Marshall Plan for Moms has inspired legislation in the U.S. House and Senate, as well as the New York and Los Angeles city councils.


136 views